CIITR Researchers Help El Paso MPO Plan for the Future

Researchers at TTI’s Center for International Intelligent Transportation Research are helping El Paso’s Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) gather baseline data via a regional survey about how residents currently travel around the region. Ultimately, the information will help the MPO decide how to shape its forthcoming multimodal plan by taking into account the public’s preferences and attitudes about various travel modes, like walking and biking. | Read the MPO’s Blog on the Project

Better Understanding Pedestrian Travel on the Paso Del Norte Bridge: Phase 1

Supporting the economic development of both Ciudad Juárez and El Paso, the Paso del Norte (PDN) Bridge is one of the busiest border pedestrian crossings between Texas and Mexico. Over the last several years, pedestrian traffic has decreased significantly, partially due to long wait times at border crossings. Understanding changes in pedestrian traffic trends is critical for retailers to efficiently conduct business and can help authorities meet the mobility, safety, security, personal and public health, and socio-economic needs of citizens. | Read the Featured Project Page

Addressing Environmental Justice Concerns When Developing Tolling Policies for the Border Region

Required security inspections and increased truck traffic at U.S.-Mexico border crossings create delays that are disruptive and costly to manufacturers, shippers and, ultimately, consumers. For shippers, time is money, so being able to monitor and quantify even small variations in delay at the border can have a measurable impact on a company’s bottom line. With sufficient accurate information, shippers can build in buffer time for some shipments or take other steps to adjust for the delays. | Read the Featured Project Page

El Paso Socio-Economic-Health Data Assessment

While transportation can benefit local communities—facilitating evacuations during disasters, for example—it can also present hazards. Learning more about the people in a region can help agencies better determine how to mitigate risks to (and better serve) local communities. Local agencies can better understand and address a population’s risk of being adversely affected by environmental circumstances by leveraging readily available social, economic, and health data about their communities. | Read the Featured Project Page

Determining Economic Costs of Border Crossing Delays

Required security inspections and increased truck traffic at U.S.-Mexico border crossings create delays that are disruptive and costly to manufacturers, shippers and, ultimately, consumers. For shippers, time is money, so being able to monitor and quantify even small variations in delay at the border can have a measurable impact on a company’s bottom line. With sufficient accurate information, shippers can build in buffer time for some shipments or take other steps to adjust for the delays. | Read the Featured Project Page

TTI on the Border

As economies become more global, international urban centers like El Paso, Texas, face increasing pressure on their local transportation networks. These challenges drive the transportation research conducted by the Texas A&M Transportation Institute’s (TTI’s) Center for International Intelligent Transportation Research (CIITR). Research findings from CIITR staff often provide the foundation upon which public- and private-sector stakeholders build new opportunities for improving and expanding international trade and tourism. | Read the Article

Computer Simulations Explore “What If” Disaster Scenarios

A devastating flood in 2006 tested the El Paso region’s ability to deal with a natural disaster. Six years later, a relatively minor (2.5 magnitude) earthquake rattled the area, fortunately causing no injuries or damage, but still raising questions about what might have been. Until now, the best any city or agency could do would be to assess the results of such an event and then act, using a responsive approach. Advances in computer modeling, however, now make a proactive plan more possible, potentially giving planners the head start they need to minimize the public-safety and economic consequences of a disaster. | Read the Article

Tracking Freight Traffic Trends at the U.S.-Mexico Border

Since 2009, TTI’s Center for International Intelligent Transportation Research (CIITR) has studied freight activities of U.S.-Mexico POEs in Texas, California, Arizona, and New Mexico. Using data from the Trans-Border Surface Freight Database of the U.S. Bureau of Transportation, CIITR researchers have identified trends and quantified variations in freight movement across the border. (Read the Featured Project Page)

Assessment of Multiple Layers of Security Screening of Trucks by Customs Border Protection in El Paso, Texas

Researchers with TTI’s Center for International Intelligent Transportation Research and the Coalición Empresarial Pro Libre Comercio have identified reasons why companies sometimes choose not to join trusted shipper programs. Generally speaking, recommendations for increasing membership involve program champions. Learn more in the project factsheet.